Translate

Saturday, 18 November 2017

Red Hills Road

Red Hills Road


  

In the years when Movado reigned as the richest voice in the dance, because Banton had not yet been returned, an angel appeared unto a youth, who they called Day, who was the only child left one afternoon in the schoolyard.
His Principal walked to him and said,
    "Youth, your father will not come for you because the Red Hills Road has been split in two and no vehicles can come across. It will be safer to be with the people in a group rather than here alone."
With that, Day left and walked through the Dale until he came to the terminus where indeed a multitude was gathered in distress and dismay.
The major road called Red Hills Road had been split in two from the parish boundary near Sligoville to – Eastwood (called so because it had few trees), a distance of 16 kilometres. Along the entire length of the road, was a chasm 10 metres deep with jagged edges and a rushing stream of filth flowed through the gape.
Day saw his father on the other side and waited for some instruction, for something to happen. He saw his cat Manchester standing by his father, and then, Day realised that the cat was rubbing up against his own Day's leg.
    "How did you cross the road Manchester?" he asked as he bent down to pick up the cat which only loped a few steps away and stopped again. Day walked away from the crowd for his cat and was amazed to see it change into the shape of an angel with rough skin like a ginger root. He was sore afraid at the sight of the apparition.
The angel reached out and anointed the boy on his head with flavourful pimento butter and told him that his mission was to repair the huge breakage in Red Hills Road. The angel, with a silent cry, reshaped into a Barble Dove and flew away.
There was no one to ask how or why, so the boy kneeled and prayed, asking for guidance and strength. He prayed saying:
    "You called me from my humble place of ignorance to do your will and show goodness to the world. Guide me now in a performance, and show that through you, all things are possible."
When he rose, his foot hit a smooth pebble, grey and tough, that had been forged in the centre of the earth and extruded by the force of an ancient volcano from mountains of the East. Day gave thanks for the one stone and threw it hard into the roaring water of the chasm. The earth shook, the people exclaimed and fled away, but Day focused on finding a second hard stone. He saw one kotching a door open and he flung it in. The earth rumbled more. With each stone, a kilometre of roadway was filled in with tightly packed, smooth, grey or white river stones.
In an hour, the rumbling stopped and the chasm, 16 Km long and 10 metres deep, was solidly filled. The flow of filth had ceased, and the road was whole and the infrastructure was more solid than it had ever been.
The people came back, and their throats were filled with praises, then they asked "How will we drive along this road as it is not paved?" They worried for their front end parts, and became angry because of the state of the bad road.
Day had walked over to his father and held his hand, but this time he kneeled again and prayed saying:
    "Do not be angry with us for not appreciating this solid road which is already being used, it is our sustenance. I ask you now to grant us comfort, show me how to make the way smooth."
As he completed his prayer with an Amen, a flock of grackles with shining black feathers flew from the North West and descended in droves. As each alighted, it gave a shriek and crumbled into asphaltic concrete and became Barber Greene. Flock after flock of grackles, and a few John Crows, so did give up their lives.
By night, the road was complete.
    "Give heed to this mighty work", said Day. "Our unsustainable lifestyles put us in danger. We have been taken from this and given firm support, and now comfort. Let us set aside time for fervent thanksgiving before we find another reason to celebrate the joys of life."

END